Showing all posts tagged: smartphones

Reading the future in the cracks of your smartphone screen

21 September 2022
Cracked smartphone screen, photo by Jan Kuss

Image courtesy of Jan Kuss/(Instagram).

I wouldn’t go doing this deliberately… there must be better ways to learn what the future holds, like waiting until it happens perhaps. Nonetheless, there may be a way to glimpse your future in the cracks of a smashed smartphone screen, and it’s known as smashomancy.

A smartphone screen is, of course, a veritable semantic orchard of icons and affordances, titles and statuses and means of navigation. But to find true insight we must look beyond the legible to more uncertain and chaotic territory. True, a smartphone in its role as a nexus of communication is an endless stream of signal and noise, but that is extrinsic to its embodied self. To truly understand its meaning, we must understand its physical nature.

Your future is indeed in the palm of your hand.

THINGS TO DO

Share to TwitterShare to FacebookBuy me a coffee

RELATED CONTENT

,

The intrusive nature of mobile phones predicted in 1920

22 August 2022
Mobile phone cartoon, William Haselden, circa 1920

William Haselden, a British cartoonist who died in 1953, quite comically foresaw the potential nuisance mobile phones could cause, were they ever to be invented. At the time Haselden drew this cartoon, possibly around 1920, landline phones were still something of a novelty, with Americans sharing one such device between ten people.

I’m not sure when mobile, or portable, phones were first envisaged — likely relatively early in the piece though, even if their development took decades — but I doubt Haselden thought they would ever come into existence. Instead I suspect he was foreshadowing the vexatious nature of a communications device permitting a caller to contact another person at any time they wished, whether the person being called liked it or not.

THINGS TO DO

Share to TwitterShare to FacebookBuy me a coffee

RELATED CONTENT

, , ,

Blockade Australia protestors forced to surrender smartphones, passcodes

29 June 2022

Say what you will about the recent Blockade Australia protests (do we not now have a climate-change friendly government?), but the conduct of police in dealing with the protestors they have been detaining has been causing alarm.

According to Digital Rights Watch, an organisation dedicated to protecting the digital rights of Australians, some arresting officers are demanding alleged offenders hand over devices such as smartphones, and also surrender access passcodes.

Digital Rights Watch has also been made aware of an incident where an individual who was simply near a location thought to be connected with Blockade Australia activities has had their phone seized by police. The police made a number of attempts to guess the passcode before handing the phone back.

Posted at Daring Fireball yesterday, and possibly useful: how to temporarily disable face id or touch id, and require a passcode to unlock your iPhone or iPad.

THINGS TO DO

Share to TwitterShare to FacebookBuy me a coffee

RELATED CONTENT

, ,

SmartFone Flick Fest 2022, a smartphone film contest

21 June 2022

Making a film is easy, especially when just about all you need on the production side is a good smartphone. Making a good film though? That’s another story. Still, I’m willing to bet the standard will be pretty high in this year’s SmartFone Flick Fest, which is accepting entries across five categories until Thursday 1 September 2022. I’m curious to see what difference technologies such as the iPhone’s cinematic mode will make to submissions this year.

THINGS TO DO

Share to TwitterShare to FacebookBuy me a coffee

RELATED CONTENT

, ,

What is your oblong doing to you?

14 February 2022

Your oblong (called a smartphone in the real world) allows you do all sorts of things: work, play, organise your finances, take and share photos, participate in word games, and read books. But this functionality and usefulness may come at a cost, particularly when it comes to reading: reduced comprehension. This according to research lead by Motoyasu Honma of the Showa University School of Medicine, in Japan.

We found that, compared to reading on a paper medium, reading on a smartphone elicits fewer sighs, promotes brain overactivity in the prefrontal cortex, and results in reduced comprehension.

THINGS TO DO

Share to TwitterShare to FacebookBuy me a coffee

RELATED CONTENT